10/5 Defining Impact: Building the Case for Arts Support

by admin on October 1, 2010

NYU Wagner’s Student Network Exploring Arts & Culture (SNEAC) hosted a Creative Conversation about why arts programs need to define their impact and how they can evaluate their success.

Listen to the podcast.
(Scroll down by date.)

Panelists:

These arts and social science leaders addressed questions such as: How do we demonstrate that the arts can meaningfully contribute to social change?  Who’s making a good case for arts funding?  How can we shape our creative passions into evidence of impact?  What specific benefits can the arts give individuals and communities?  What exactly are our “theories of change?”  How do we know when our arts programs have been successful?  What can we learn about demonstrating effectiveness from social service and education programs?  When is “arts for arts sake” the best argument?

Want a good intro to these issues?  Read Andras’ article , “Funding: The State of the Art” in The Arts Newspaper.

WHEN: Tuesday, October 5, 6:30pm
WHERE: NYU Wagner Rudin Family Forum, The Puck Building, 295 Lafayette Street, Manhattan

Randy Bourscheidt is the president of the Alliance for the Arts, a New York-based arts advocacy organization. His longtime professional involvement in the arts in New York has included serving as deputy commissioner of cultural affairs in the 1980s and as chairman of the New York City Advisory Commission for Cultural Affairs in the 1990s.

Under his leadership, the Alliance has published a number of studies on the cultural community in the city, state and region including: Arts as an Industry: Their Economic Impact on New York City and New York State; NYC Arts Audiences: Attendance at NYC Cultural Venues; Culture Builds New York: The Economic Impact of Capital Construction at New York City Cultural Institutions and Who Pays for the Arts: Income for the Nonprofit Cultural Industry in New York City. The Alliance also publishes the newly designed promotional Web sites, NYC-ARTS.org and NYCkidsARTS.org.

Randy is a trustee of the American Friends of the Paris Opera and Ballet, City Center of Music and Drama, the George Balanchine Foundation, the Landmarks Preservation Foundation, and Moving Theater. He is a former chairman of the Committee for the Dance Collection of the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center, and a former trustee of Creative Time. He is a member of the National Committee of Glimmerglass Opera, on the advisory committee of Chez Bushwick and chairman of the Brendan Gill Prize jury of the Municipal Art Society.

András Szántó is a writer, researcher, and consultant whose work spans the worlds of art, media, and cultural affairs. He is a Senior Lecturer in Art Business at the Sotheby’s Institute of Art New York, a contributing editor to The Art Newspaper, and co-founder of ArtworldSalon, the international website on art-world affairs. He has served as an advisor on strategy, programming, and marketing and communications for leading cultural institutions and foundations in the U.S. and worldwide. He is the former director of the National Arts Journalism Program, a fellowship program and think tank on cultural journalism, research, and public debate on the arts at Columbia University, where he has also directed the NEA Arts Journalism Institute. He has been a Visiting Critic at the American Academy in Rome, a Visiting Senior Fellow at the Center for Arts and Culture in Washington, DC, and Research Affiliate of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies at Princeton University. The co-author and editor of five books and numerous research reports, his journalism has appeared in The New York Times, Artforum, The Boston Globe, The Los Angeles Times, Architecture, I.D., Museum Practice, and many other publications. He is co-author of A Portrait of the Visual Arts: Meeting the Challenges of a New Era, the influential 2005 RAND study on the art world. He has organized international conferences on issues in the arts and regularly moderates high-profile discussions at Art Basel, Art Basel Miami Beach and other major international events. Szántó, who holds a Ph.D. in sociology from Columbia, lives in New York City with his wife and son.   Read Andras’ article, “Funding: The State of the Art” in The Arts Newspaper at http://bit.ly/szanto-funding.

Ian David Moss
serves as the Research Director of Fractured Atlast, a non-profit organization that serves a national community of artists and arts organizations. Fractured Atlas’s programs and services facilitate the creation of art by offering vital support to the artists who produce it. They help artists and arts organizations function more effectively as businesses by providing access to funding, healthcare, education, and more, all in a context that honors their individuality and independent spirit. By nurturing today’s talented but underrepresented voices, Fractured Atlas hopes to foster a dynamic and diverse cultural landscape of tomorrow.

Ian is primarily responsible for the development of the Bay Area Cultural Asset Map (BACAM), a new tool enabling better understanding of the arts ecosystem through the integration of multiple data streams. Ian graduated with an MBA in nonprofit management and strategy from the Yale School of Management. While there, he founded Createquity, a highly acclaimed arts policy blog, and completed an internship with the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation for which he developed the original blueprint for BACAM and co-created the Foundation’s first logic model for the performing arts. A composer since the age of 12, he was previously Development Manager for the American Music Center and founded two first-of-their-kind performing ensembles: a hybrid electric chamber group/experimental rock band and a choral collective devoted to the music of the past 25 years.

Jason Franklin has a background in philanthropy education, nonprofit strategy and leadership, and urban policy and education advocacy. He serves as Executive Director of Bolder Giving, a nonprofit organization seeking to inspire people to give at their full lifetime giving potential. He is also a Lecturer on Public Administration and Doctoral Candidate at New York University’s Wagner School of Public Service. His research focuses on the role of charitable foundations in the policy making process. Jason teaches courses on philanthropy, nonprofit management, and public policy including Philanthropy, Advocacy & Social Change; Strategic Management for Public Service Organizations; and Theory and Practice of Grantmaking. He was the  Distinguished Doctoral Teacher of the Year in both 2009 and 2010.

He is an experienced national donor educator and leader with over a decade of volunteer, professional and scholarly experience in philanthropic and social change work. He serves on the boards of Resource Generation, North Star Fund, and Social Justice Philanthropy Collaborative and on the advisory board of Wealth for the Common Good. Prior to his work with Bolder Giving, he worked at the 21st Century School Fund where he most recently served as Deputy Director. Previously, he coordinated the Rockefeller Foundation’s Next Generation Leadership Network housed at the NYU Research Center for Leadership in Action and has also worked for the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, White House Office of National AIDS Policy, and Oregon Commission on Children and Families.

A serial social entrepreneur, he co-founded Oregon Students Supporting Education (a statewide student organizing effort that helped prevent major budget cuts to Oregon public schools), the Multnomah Youth Commission (a youth-led agency that advises city and county leaders on program and policy decisions), and IAM LLC (an urban brownfield development planning firm that won the 2004 Goldman Sachs Global Social Venture Competition). He has an MS in Urban Policy and Nonprofit Management from the New School’s Milano Graduate School and a BA in Political Communication from the George Washington University.

NYU Wagner’s Student Network Exploring Arts & Culture (SNEAC) invites you to a Creative Conversation about why arts programs need to define their impact and how they can evaluate their success.
Share this Article

{ 1 trackback }

Podcast for 10/5 Panel on Defining Impact: Building the Case for Arts Support
October 13, 2010 at 2:43 pm

{ 0 comments… add one now }

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: